Neil Young is an icon to music lovers. There is no denying his talent. Young is one of the most gifted musicians ever. His music has spanned generations. However, like many, Neil Young has been consumed by the wave of wokeism-induced conformity.

Young now believes he should use his music to manipulate public opinion. Recent threats to pull his music from Spotify contradict much of what Neil Young’s songs have represented. Young has often presented an aura that “flies in the face of conformity.”

He’s an archetype of personal choice. Some of Young’s most legendary lyrics insist that we must stand against tyranny and oppression. But that’s not what Neil is doing with his decision to yank his songs off Spotify.

Because Spotify’s policies allow for diverse opinions, Joe Rogan is another popular target for listeners. Instead of agreeing to disagree with Rogan’s ideology, Young wants to force Spotify to censor the popular podcast producer.

Again, a musician who made millions of dollars assailing the establishment is now kowtowing to the establishment. To say the least, it seems rather ironic. Young has garnered massive public appeal for a number of his controversial songs.

No one will ever forget the Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young anti-war protest song “Ohio”. Young penned one of the most iconic songs of a generation. The quartet still lands on many lists of politically charged bands. Now, we shouldn’t forget that Young wasn’t born an American.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame legend is Canadian by birth. To add more irony to his latest attempt at strong-arm censorship, Young didn’t become a U.S. citizen until early 2020. Some say this was a publicity stunt just to vote against President Donald Trump.

Even more ironic is Young’s career tendency to script scathing lyrics about the country that made him wealthy. He was actually honest in one interview when he revealed his love of “grass” delayed his push for U.S. citizenship.

Now, instead of voicing love and respect for the country that helped make him famous, he’s trying to squash one of our most cherished rights. “Freedom of Speech” helped make Neil Young rich. But now he wants to walk all over someone else’s First Amendment rights.

Does this sound familiar? If you think so, well, you’re correct. That’s the telltale script practiced by the liberal cancel culture. It’s the “chorus line for wokies”. Every right or freedom they agree with is fine. However, if any thought or opinion contradicts their narrative, it’s “bad stuff, man”.

Elite Hollywood types have long set themselves apart from ordinary Americans. The fact is that without everyday Americans, they’d be nothing. If no one listened to their music, they’d be little more than starving artists, plopped on a corner, idly strumming tunes beside a coffee can.

But as soon as they get a taste of fame, they’re ready to become political activists. There’s one big problem. While they advocate for their own cause, they invariably feel entitled to stomp on everyone else’s God-given opinion. It’s wrong.

It’s hypocritical. Not everyone is going to agree with everyone else. If you want to stomp your feet and throw a temper tantrum, taking your toys and going home like a spoiled brat, go right ahead. It’s your right. But to tell the world who or what they can listen to isn’t.

Maybe you and “The Boss” can charter a plane and move to a “freer country”. Wait, Mr. Young, haven’t you made a fortune singing songs because of the constitutional right to freedom of speech? Welcome to “Rockin’ in the Real World” Neil Young, get over yourself.

UPDATE:

As they should, Spotify made their decision and decided to stick with Joe Rogan!

Daniel

Daniel is a conservative syndicated opinion writer and amateur theologian. He writes about topics of politics, culture, freedom, and faith.

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