People will likely always be curious as to whether or not former Vice President Mike Pence actually had the power to change the outcome of the 2020 election.

Many people believe that Mike Pence could have rejected the electors or chosen the ones which he felt were valid. Some say that he could not really have done that at all.

If you ask the Democrats, you know what they’re going to say; that he didn’t have the authority to do such a thing. I would have set a precedent that nobody would want.

But if that’s really true, then why are Democrats trying to pass legislation to prevent that from happening if it already is unable to happen?

A statement from President Trump said:

If the Vice President (Mike Pence) had “absolutely no right” to change the Presidential Election results in the Senate, despite fraud and many other irregularities, how come the Democrats and RINO Republicans, like Wacky Susan Collins, are desperately trying to pass legislation that will not allow the Vice President to change the results of the el3ection? Actually, what they are saying, is that Mike Pence did have the right to change the outcome, and they now want to take that right away. Unfortunately, he didn’t exercise that power, he could have overturned the Election!

But wait a minute…I thought the left was saying that Mike Pence couldn’t do that?

According to NBC,

President Donald Trump claimed Tuesday that Vice President Mike Pence could single-handedly reject certain electors during Congress’ Electoral College certification process, turning up the pressure on him to help overturn the results of the election.

“The Vice President has the power to reject fraudulently chosen electors,” Trump tweeted…

…This is false.

Pence, in his role as president of the Senate, is scheduled to preside over Congress’ certification of the results Wednesday, as detailed by the 12th Amendment. But he can’t intervene in the process.

The law governing the certification process, the Electoral Count Act of 1887, specifically limits the power of the president of the Senate precisely because a president of the Senate had intervened in the count previously. In 1857, after James Buchanan’s win, the Senate president overruled an objection against Wisconsin electors who had been delayed in their certification process by a snowstorm in 1856.

“One of the points of the Electoral Count Act is to constrain the vice president given this earlier episode and make it clear that he’s a presider, not a decider,” said former Federal Election Commission Chairman Trevor Potter, president of the Campaign Legal Center.

I’m going to be honest. I really don’t know the legality of this matter. My inclination is to believe that Mike Pence did not have the authority to send reject the certifications of the electors or to choose different electors than what was certified by the state. However, I’ve seen some valid points from the other side as well.

Daniel

Daniel is a conservative syndicated opinion writer and amateur theologian. He writes about topics of politics, culture, freedom, and faith.

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