Gun control activists and left-wing media organizations are outraged about the labeling of an armed hero who stopped a mass shooting at an Indiana mall on Sunday as a “Good Samaritan.”

Elisjsha “Eli” Dicken, 22, is said to have saved lives by shooting down a man in the Greenwood Park Mall who had already killed three people and injured two others. Dicken, who had a gun in his possession legally, is not universally hailed as a hero, and some people took issue with the religious accolades.

For heaven’s sake! What would they have preferred to happen? They are upset with him because he stopped a shooter. What possible sense can that make? They are criticizing the events that took place at Uvalde, but they are also condemning the events that took place at Greenwood Park Mall. This just sounds like they’re talking out of both sides of their mouth to me.

This is comparable to some nonsense I witnessed earlier this week when protesters were protesting a police shooting that resulted in the death of a man who had just attempted to murder another woman in front of her own children.

The reason some people are objecting to this term is because the man killed someone while the Good Samaritan helped someone else who was hurt.

“The term, ‘Good Samaritan’ came from a Bible passage of a man from Samaria who stopped on the side of the road to help a man who was injured and ignored,” local CBS 4 traffic anchor Justin Kollar tweeted. “I cannot believe we live in a world where the term can equally apply to someone killing someone… my God.”

The application is that someone stopped and helped someone in need. There were several people in need because a madman was killing people.

Justing Kollar even went on to say that “While I’m no biblical scholar I believe the Christ coined term, G S, misses the mark in this context, especially after Christ’s action in Luke 22:49”.

He’s obviously no biblical scholar. The passage never says, “Good Samaritan”, that’s just the way that we identify it. So, his claim that it is a “Christ coined term” is wrong. And like I said, the concept of selflessly helping someone in need is the principle in play, which definitely applies here.

Daniel

Daniel is a conservative syndicated opinion writer and amateur theologian. He writes about topics of politics, culture, freedom, and faith.

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